Monthly Archives: July 2012

Hispanics And African Americans Lead The Marketplace In Embracing Mobile Shopping

Small Business News for Entrepreneurs

HispanicTrending
Written by Resources for Entrepreneurs Staff
Published: 6/28/2012

Hispanic and African-Americans are among the earliest adopters of mobile shopping technologies.

Smartphones are more popular than ever with some estimates that mobile penetration is now nearly 50 percent of the total U.S. marketplace. But one of the most surprising aspects of today’s mobile channel is the rapid pace at which Hispanic and African-American consumers are utilizing mobile shopping technologies.

Mobile Use in Hispanic Latino Demographic

The Checkout, an ongoing consumer shopping behavior study published by The Integer Group and M/A/R/C Research reports that 18 percent of African-American consumers and 16 percent of Hispanic consumers regularly use their mobile devices for purchase transactions — rates that are significantly higher than the 10 percent of Caucasians who use mobile for online purchases.

Additionally, 21 percent of African American shoppers use mobile technology for product reviews or shopping lists (compared to 13 percent of Caucasians) and 20 percent of Hispanic shoppers routinely perform mobile price comparisons.

“Basic mobile communication through SMS and mobile websites should be the points of entry,” said Martin Ferro, senior account planner for Velocidad, a Hispanic promotional, retail and shopper marketing capability of The Integer Group. “Mobile marketing to multicultural shoppers is a huge opportunity.”

Women are substantially ahead of men in leveraging mobile technology for shopping and now use electronic coupons at least as much as they do coupons clipped from print publications. Not surprisingly, the presence of children in any home (regardless of ethnicity) accelerates the adoption of digital technologies, including the use of mobile technologies as a shopping resource.

For many small business owners, the rising influence of mobile across all demographics may require embracing new technology and investing in mobile channel resources. Minimally, small businesses should have a mobile-optimized website capable of providing basic mobile shopping experiences.

“Digital shoppers are just shoppers,” said Ben Kennedy, group director of Mobile Marketing at Integer. “Digital shopping tools are illustrative of the continued blurring of the on- and offline spaces. Today’s reality is that shoppers use whatever tools they have on hand to make them smarter, savvier shoppers.”

MBA Mondays: Asking An Employee To Leave The Company

AVC musings of a VC in NYC
Jul 2,2012

I don’t like using terms like “fire” or “terminate.” To me they have too much emotion attached to them to be appropriate when splitting with an employee. I like to say that “fred was asked to leave the company” or “fred, we need you to leave the company.” That works better for me and, I think, it also works better for the person who is being asked to leave the company.

But more than how to say it, I think how you do it is paramount. Here are some simple rules along with some color commentary on each:

1) Be quick – once you’ve made a decision to let someone go, move quickly to do it. Don’t procrastinate. Do get things buttoned up (terms of departure, departure date, how it will be communicated, etc) but once you’ve got things in order, have the conversation.

2) Be generous – Unless the employee has acted in extreme bad faith or done something terribly wrong, I like to be generous on the way out. I like to give some severance even if it is not required by company policy or contract. I like to vest some stock that may not be required to be vested. I like to paint the departure in as favorable light as possible. And I like to say good things about the person once they are gone. I like to be generous in financial terms and emotional terms. It makes things go easier for everyone. (more…)

On YouTube, Amateur Is the New Pro



By ROB WALKER
Published: June 28, 2012

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/07/01/magazine/on-youtube-amateur-is-the-new-pro.html?_r=1&pagewanted=all

A kid from Nebraska shows up in New York City to make it big. This kid was Bryan Odell, a 21-year-old college dropout who lived with his parents. Gangly, with curly blond hair, he looked and talked­ as if he arrived straight from central casting. (“I was just a kid from Nebraska,” he says.) But central casting had nothing to do with it. As an aspiring YouTuber, he cast himself.

Self Portraits of YouTubers Top row: Maangchi Kim, Jimmy Wong and Meghan Camarena. Middle: Richard Ryan, Matt Giudice and Franchesca Ramsey. Bottom: Meghan Tonjes, Peter Bragiel and Bryan Odell.

Odell’s destination was the Manhattan office of Google Inc., YouTube’s corporate parent. He was among the 25 winners of a competition called Next Up, which is aimed at “accelerating the growth of the next big YouTube stars,” as an official YouTube blog explained. The prize included four days of tips and training from “YouTube experts” in New York. It also included a $35,000 check, no strings attached. (more…)

The ‘Busy’ Trap

Opinionator - A Gathering of Opinion From Around the Web
June 30, 2012,
By TIM KREIDER

If you live in America in the 21st century you’ve probably had to listen to a lot of people tell you how busy they are. It’s become the default response when you ask anyone how they’re doing: “Busy!” “So busy.” “Crazy busy.” It is, pretty obviously, a boast disguised as a complaint. And the stock response is a kind of congratulation: “That’s a good problem to have,” or “Better than the opposite.”

It’s not as if any of us wants to live like this; it’s something we collectively force one another to do.

Notice it isn’t generally people pulling back-to-back shifts in the I.C.U. or commuting by bus to three minimum-wage jobs  who tell you how busy they are; what those people are is not busy but tired. Exhausted. Dead on their feet. It’s almost always people whose lamented busyness is purely self-imposed: work and obligations they’ve taken on voluntarily, classes and activities they’ve “encouraged” their kids to participate in. They’re busy because of their own ambition or drive or anxiety, because they’re addicted to busyness and dread what they might have to face in its absence.

Almost everyone I know is busy. They feel anxious and guilty when they aren’t either working or doing something to promote their work. They schedule in time with friends the way students with 4.0 G.P.A.’s  make sure to sign up for community service because it looks good on their college applications. I recently wrote a friend to ask if he wanted to do something this week, and he answered that he didn’t have a lot of time but if something was going on to let him know and maybe he could ditch work for a few hours. I wanted to clarify that my question had not been a preliminary heads-up to some future invitation; this was the invitation. But his busyness was like some vast churning noise through which he was shouting out at me, and I gave up trying to shout back over it.

Brecht Vandenbroucke

Even children are busy now, scheduled down to the half-hour with classes and extracurricular activities. They come home at the end of the day as tired as grown-ups. I was a member of the latchkey generation and had three hours of totally unstructured, largely unsupervised time every afternoon, time I used to do everything from surfing the World Book Encyclopedia to making animated films to getting together with friends in the woods to chuck dirt clods directly into one another’s eyes, all of which provided me with important skills and insights that remain valuable to this day. Those free hours became the model for how I wanted to live the rest of my life. (more…)

Africa on the Rise


The Sunday Review
By Published: June 30, 2012

GENERATIONS of Americans have learned to pity Africa. It’s mainly seen as a quagmire of famine and genocide, a destination only for a sybaritic safari or a masochistic aid mission.

So here’s another way to think of Africa: an economic dynamo. Is it time to prepare for the African tiger economy? Six of the world’s 10 fastest-growing economies between 2001 and 2010 were in Africa, according to The Economist. The International Monetary Fund says that between 2011 and 2015, African countries will account for 7 of the top 10 spots.

Africa isn’t just a place for safaris or humanitarian aid. It’s also a place to make money. Global companies are expanding in Africa; vast deposits of oil, gas and minerals are being discovered; and Goldman Sachs recently issued a report, “Africa’s Turn,” comparing business opportunities in Africa with those in China in the early 1990s.

I’m writing this column in Lesotho, a mountainous kingdom (it was snowing the day I arrived!) in southern Africa, on my annual win-a-trip journey. The winner this year, Jordan Schermerhorn, an engineering student at Rice University, and I visited garment factories that make clothing for American stores. This country is Africa’s biggest apparel exporter to America. (more…)

Top Five YouTube Partner Channels Drive Nearly 1.5 Billion Monthly Streams

June 25, 2012

May 2012 marks the first month that Nielsen is publicly reported streaming measurement on thousands of YouTube partners. The top five YouTube Partner channels, led by Vevo, Warner Music Group and Machinima, combined for nearly 1.5 billion total streams. YouTube provides content creators with tools and programs to improve their skills, build their audiences, and monetize their videos.

To put this into context, YouTube continues to be the top online video destination in the U.S. with over 136 million unique viewers who streamed 16 billion videos during May 2012.

Top 5 YouTube Partner Channels Ranked on Unique U.S. Viewers – May 2012 (Total)
YouTube Partner
Channel
Unique Viewers (000) Total Streams (000)
1. Vevo* 41,362 694,907
2. WMG 22,894 172,985
3. Machinima 17,625 429,962
4. Fullscreen 12,484 79,761
5. Maker 9,655 93,588
Read as: During May 2012, 41.4 million unique U.S. viewers watched video content on Vevo
Source: Nielsen; Totals include content streaming only; it does not include claimed user-generated content

Mobile Is Where The Growth Is

AVC
July 1, 2012

If you look at any of the top web properties on comScore, Quantcast, Alexa or any other third party reporting service you will see that they all have been fairly flat over the first half of the year. You might think that all these big web services are flatlining.

We have seen this in our portfolio too. From board meeting to board meeting, we are seeing a similar pattern. Web is flattish. But mobile is growing like a weed.

I alluded to this in a post last week where I wished for an aggregated audience measurement service across mobile and web.

There is a significant shift going on this year, much more significant than we saw last year, from web to mobile. It is most noticeable in games, social networking, music, and news, but it is happening across the board and it presents both great opportunity and great challenges.

Mobile native services like Foursquare & Instagram have the most to gain from this transition. Big feature rich web apps like Facebook and Google have the most to lose from this transition. (more…)